Exh. Cats. by Gallery

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A Pioneering Collection: Master Drawings from the Crocker Art Museum

The master drawings at the Crocker Art Museum, dating from the late fifteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries, form an unusually rich and historic collection, known to include many keystones of the history of art. Sheets by Carpaccio, Dürer, Callot and Boucher only scratch the surface of a collection whose sources include the great eighteenth-century collectors Pierre-Jean Mariette, Pierre Crozat, Joshua Reynolds and Antoine-Joseph Dezallier d'Argenville, their seventeenth-century predecessors Evrard Jabach, Nicolas Lanier, Jan Pietersz. More

The Art of William Heath Robinson

In the 1930s William Heath Robinson (1872–1944) was known as “The Gadget King” and he is still most widely remembered for his wonderful humorous drawings and illustrations. This book, containing over 100 of his finest, accompanied the first exhibition ever held of William Heath Robinson’s work as illustrator as well as humourist. More

Inspired by Italy: Dutch Landscape Painting 1600–1700

'Dutch Italianate painting’ is an important as well as appealing strand of landscape painting in the seventeenth century. Some of the artists who practised it – Jan Both, Jan Asselyn, Jan Baptist Weenix, Nicolaes Berchem – had visited Italy, others, most famously Aelbert Cuyp, had not. More

Soane’s Favourite Subject: The Story of Dulwich Picture Gallery

The most individual English architect since Vanbrugh, Sir John Soane was a Romantic classicist, known for his experimental interest in effects of light and space. Dulwich Picture Gallery is one of the few intact creations of his genius, not only remarkably preserved but still serving the function for which it was built, as a picture gallery (as such highly influential ever since). More

Salvator Rosa

Salvator Rosa was one of the boldest and most powerfully inventive artists and personalities of the Italian 17th century. In Britain he is now best known for his wild landscapes, those scenes of which Horace Walpole so memorably wrote: “Precipices, mountains, torrents, wolves, rumblings – Salvator Rosa”. But Rosa was far more than this... More

Twombly and Poussin: Arcadian Painters

Accompanying a unique exhibition at Dulwich Picture Gallery, London, of the work of Nicolas Poussin and Cy Twombly, who sadly died on 5 July this year, this book is "so unusual and its theme so enduringly relevant, especially now, that it truly should not be missed" (The Spectator). More

Adriaen van de Velde: Dutch Master of Landscape

Accompanying the first ever exhibition devoted to the Dutch painter and draughtsman Adriaen van de Velde (1636–1672), this is also the first monograph on the artist – one of the finest of the Dutch Golden Age. The Art Newspaper billed the exhibition as one of their top picks of 2016 and it has been nominated for a 2016 Global Fine Art Award. More

Towards an Art History of Medieval Rings REPRINT

Toward an Art History of Medieval Rings gives a full survey of Merovingian, Byzantine, Medieval and Renaissance rings, building on the basis of a private collection of 35 rings assembled over nearly two decades. These rings range in date from around 300 to 1600 AD and are fine examples of most of the major types of ring created during this period. They include marriage rings, seal rings, stirrup rings, tart mould rings, iconographic rings, merchant rings and gemstone rings and are arranged chronologically. More

An Intimate Art: 12 Books of Hours for 2012

Books of Hours are probably the most famous of all medieval illuminated manuscripts. Presented here are twelve Books of Hours that date from the origins of the genre in the thirteenth century to its eclipse in the sixteenth century. Examples come from France, Italy and the Southern and Northern Netherlands and are by many notable artists, including Pietro da Pavia, Belbello da Pavia, the Master of Zweder van Culenburg, the Master of the Gold Scrolls, Willem Vrelant, Guillaume II le Roy and Jean Poyer. More

Byzantium and the West: Jewelry in the First Millennium

This full-colour catalogue explores the interrelationships between the East and West during the first millennium. This was the first time that the Roman Empire was gradually replaced by barbarian invaders, who spread through Europe and created new styles of jewellery; it was also when the capital shifted eastward to the newly founded city of Constaninople. More

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