Exh. Cats. by Gallery

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Paths to Reform: Things new and old

Paths to Reform traces the fascinating and turbulent history of reform in the Medieval and Early Modern Church from the twelfth through the seventeenth centuries as seen through 40 contemporary manuscripts and a number of printed books. Brought together, these manuscripts – their physical format, their text and illustrations – offer a new historical perspective as well as vivid testimony to the ways in which communities of the faithful practiced their beliefs. More

Flowering of Medieval French Literature “Au parler que m’aprist ma mere”

A reassessment of the history of medieval French literature through close examination of rare and little-known medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, which endure as vibrant reminders of the linguistic, historical, and cultural legacy of modern-day France and the French language. More

Cycles of Life: Rings From the Benjamin Zucker Family Collection

An unparalleled collection of 41 rings dating from the 3rd to the 19th century, presented not chronologically but rather grouped into timeless themes - birth, marriage, everyday life and eternity - thereby achieving greater insight about the beliefs, sentiments, status, and practices of their former owners. More

Treasures of the English Church: A Thousand Years of Sacred Gold and Silver

There has never been a display like it. This is the catalogue to an ambitious exhibition at the Goldsmiths’ Hall, London, which will comprise 250 gold and silver objects and sets of objects spanning the history of the Church from the earliest possible times to the present day. More

Gold: Power and Allure

Few realise that gold can be found in Great Britain, and that attempts to exploit native sources have drawn prospectors from ancient Rome to Elizabethan adventurers and current commercial projects in Ireland, Scotland and Wales. In Gold: Power and Allure, eleven essays by distinguished specialists tell of the rich and previously untold story of Britain and its relationship with gold, demonstrating the country's unique golden heritage. Generously illustrated, the book features objects from the Ashmolean Museum, the Louvre, British Museum and Albert and Victoria Museum, amongst others. More

Andre Beauneveu: 'No Equal in Any Land' - Artist to the courts of France and Flanders

"This sumptuously illustrated book, which accompanied the exhibition at the Groeningemuseum in Bruges in 2007–08, is an important new study of the late-fourteenth-century Valenciennes-born sculptor André Beauneveu whose surviving works deserve to be more widely known." (Church Monuments journal) The full scope of his talent was exploited by the celebrated royal patron Jean de Berry, for whom he produced manuscript illuminations, made designs for stained glass and oversaw the construction of his château at Mehun-sur-Yevre. However, it is primarily his very great skill in the handling of stone which gives Beauneveu such particular significance in the history of late medieval art. More

Boucher and Chardin: Masters of Modern Manners

Almost 200 years ago, William Hunter (1718–1783), founder of the Hunterian Museum, Glasgow, was one of a small number of British art collectors to acquire works by his contemporary Jean-Siméon Chardin. Among these, Woman taking Tea (1735) has become something of an iconic image of French art from this period. It has a pair in a near contemporary painting Madame Boucher (1743) by François Boucher in the Frick Collection, New York. Accompanying an exhibition at the Wallace Collection, this catalogue will seek to examine relationships between these two works and their creation... More

My Highest Pleasure: William Hunter's Art Collection

Celebrating the 250th anniversary of the opening of the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow in 2007, this book provides a full study both of William Hunter - the many-faceted surgeon/connoisseur - and of his collection of art, which not only contains a number of outstanding masterpieces, such as a Rembrandt, but also provides a revealing snapshot of the taste of the period. While illuminating this crucial transitional period in British art, the book is at the same time a catalogue of the Hunterian collection. More

Anders Zorn: A European Artist Seduces America

Accompanying a major exhibition at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, Boston (28 February – 13 May 2013), this book re-evaluates the artistic achievement of Anders Zorn (1860–1920), one of the most significant artists of the Belle Époque but one who is still remarkably understudied. Bringing his subjects to life with broad, quick brushstrokes, Zorn experimented with different subjects and styles, absorbing and developing the latest trends, pushing them further. More

Donatello, Michelangelo, Cellini: Sculptors’ Drawings from Renaissance Italy

This publication, which accompanies an important exhibition at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, looks broadly at the practice of drawing by Renaissance sculptors, including such luminaries as Donatello, Verrocchio, Michelangelo, Cellini, Bandinelli and Giambologna. The book surveys two centuries of material, considering rough sketches and more finished sheets, isolated studies and sequences of ideas. More

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