Old Masters

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Art in Spain and the Hispanic World: Essays in Honor of Jonathan Brown

Over the course of the last forty years art historian Jonathan Brown has done more than anyone to reform our approach to the art of the Hispanic world between the age of El Greco and Velazquez and that of Goya. More

Gainsborough's Cottage Doors: An Insight into the Artist’s Last Decade

Inspired by the recent identification of a third autograph version of Gainsborough's masterpiece The Cottage Door, this book examines the significance of the multiple versions of designs that the artist produced during the 1780s. It demonstrates that without the pressure of exhibiting his work annually at the Academy and without a string of sitters waiting for their finished portraits, Gainsborough’s work became more personal, more thoughtful. This study of the last phase of the artist’s work is a totally fresh interpretation of not only The Cottage Door but other key works such as Mrs Sheridan and Diana and Acteon. More

The Male Nude: Eighteenth-century Drawings from the Paris Academy OUT-OF-STOCK

Painting in 18th-century France was centred on the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, where the drawing of the male human figure was at the core of the curriculum. Only after mastering the copying of drawings and engravings, and then casts of antique sculptures, would the student be allowed to progress to drawing the nude figure in the life class. Accompanying an exhibition at the Wallace Collection that is unprecedented in Britain, this beautiful publication includes drawings by Rigaud, Boucher, Nattier, Pierre, Carle van Loo, Gros and Jean-Baptiste Isabey. More

Fame and Friendship: Pope, Roubiliac and the Portrait Bust

An examination of the portraits of Alexander Pope and in particular the compelling busts, originally made for Pope’s closest friends but then multiplied and reproduced throughout the 18th century, by the groundbreaking sculptor Louis François Roubiliac. More

Joshua Reynolds: Experiments in Paint

Offering new insights into the artistic practice of Sir Joshua Reynolds, this catalogue investigates his radical manipulation of pigments, oils, glazes and varnishes. It traces his experiments with colour, tone and handling, reveals his continual temptation to rework and revise his pictures, and illuminates his highly creative responses to the new exhibition culture of his day. More

Jonathan Richardson By Himself

Jonathan Richardson (1667–1745) was one of 18th-century England’s most significant cultural figures. A leading portrait painter and influential art theorist, he also amassed one of the period’s greatest collections of drawings. But there was another, highly unusual dimension to his pursuits. In 1728, at the age of 61 and shortly before his retirement from professional life, Richardson began to create a remarkable series of self-portrait drawings. Not intended for public display, these works were unguarded explorations of his own character. More

Canadian Art: The Thomson Collection at the Art Gallery of Ontario

Together with important First Nations material, the Thomson Canadian Collection is the largest of all private holdings of Canadian art. There are rare and incomparable examples of Northwest Coast Aboriginal art. Krieghoff’s inspired accounts of life in the Canadas, prior to Confederation, bring the light and atmosphere of history fully into the present. A staggering power to capture the fleeting and the fugitive in paint still distinguishes the work of the early 20th-century painter Morrice... More

De László: A Brush with Grandeur PAPERBACK

This is the revised and updated edition of a book that originally accompanied the first retrospective exhibition of de László since his death in 1937. It illustrates a rich and representative selection of his work, drawn from a range of private collections, and, aided by stunning colour plates, re-introduces this well-known but little studied artist to a wider public. More

Division and Revision: Manet's Reichshoffen Revisited

Manet's well-known painting in the National Gallery London of a café-concert – a kind of cabaret performance and musicmaking that was the latest fashion in Paris of the 1870s – has a peculiar history. The painter initially planned an ambitious canvas with which he grew dissatisfied, then cut it in two, one half being the painting in the National Gallery and the other half now in Winterthur in Switzerland. More

The Courtauld Cézannes

The Courtauld Gallery holds the finest group of works by Paul Cézanne (1839–1906) in Britain. This is the catalogue to an exhibition showing the entire collection together for the first time, marking the culmination of The Courtauld Institute of Art’s 75th anniversary. The importance of the collection lies not only in its exceptionally high quality but also in its wide range, with seminal paintings and rarely seen drawings and watercolours from the major periods of the artist’s long career. More

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