Renaissance

The Global City: On the Streets of Renaissance Lisbon

Hardback, 280 x 245 mm 296 pages, 250 colour illustrations
PRICE: £40.00
ISBN: 978 1 907372 88 9

 

Recently identified by the editors as the Rua Nova dos Mercadores, the principal commercial and financial street in Renaissance Lisbon, two sixteenth-century paintings, acquired by Dante Gabriel Rossetti in 1866, form the starting point for this portrait of a global city in the early modern period. Focusing on unpublished objects, and incorporating newly discovered documents and inventories that allow novel interpretations of the Rua Nova and the goods for sale on it, these essays offer a compelling and original study of a metropolis whose reach once spanned four continents. Read more


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